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17 November 2022

Consumer

Don’t Start Shopping For Snowmobiles Until You Answer These Questions

Snowmobiling is a fantastic pastime that roughly 700,000 Canadians enjoy each year, but for those looking to get into the hobby, selecting which is the best machine for them can seem like a daunting task. It’s understandable considering the many expected and unexpected costs, as well as actual considerations one needs to make when choosing a vehicle that will accommodate their needs.

Before you search for the perfect snowmobile, consider these three questions.

Where Does Your Budget Stand?

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When you first start a foray into snowmobiling, it's essential to look at your budget and think about some hidden costs, most of which go beyond the basics (i.e., club/trail fees). For instance, if you're going to be riding in the mountains or obscure remote locales, you'll want to consider a high-end transceiver or beacon should you find yourself in an emergency, such as an avalanche.

Then there is actual winter gear that can help you stay warm while zooming through the snowy Canadian landscape. This is particularly important if you consider the potential for an emergency that could leave you out in the crisp wind for an extended period.

You'll also want to consider your level, as being realistic will help you save money by avoiding machines that may be dangerous to operate based on your experience.

Do You Have Access To Support?

Another vital thing to think through is whether you can access the dealership where you decide to purchase your snowmobile; with the window for enjoying your new toy not guaranteed year over year, you don’t want to risk potentially missing the snowiest days of the season driving to a remote town to get your vehicle serviced.

This is especially true when you’re buying a new machine that may be eligible for a warranty—which may be voided if you use parts or servicing not recommended by the manufacturer.

Where Do You Plan On Riding?

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Snowmobiles are not one size fits all; much like bicycles, there are entirely different machines better suited to various terrains/uses.

Trail-riding machines are best suited for riding along groomed trail systems; generally, they are heavier than deep-powder machines. Attempting to go off-trail could get you stuck in the snow, creating unnecessary frustration. Conversely, <a href=”https://snowmobilehow.com/best-snowmobile-for-deep-snow/ “>Deep-powder performers are built for rough rides off the beaten path--and can overheat if used more conservatively. Other machines are more suited for climbing mountains. It all depends on where you foresee yourself riding.

Those who aren’t sure or don’t want to subscribe to one specific lane (so to speak) can consider a crossover vehicle built to withstand both on and off-trail riding, offering the best of all worlds.

Another consideration is whether to go with a four-stroke or two-stroke snowmobile; 2-stroke engines generate power on every other stroke of the pistons in the engine, while a 4-stroke does so on every fourth stroke. Generally, 2-stroke engines are more affordable, snappier, and weigh considerably less but are guaranteed to require more maintenance than their counterpart.

Want to get on a snowmobile this winter but don’t quite have the budget in place? LendCare has spent over a decade as one of the country’s top Powersports lenders; contact us today to discover how you can turn a hefty upfront fee from your local dealership into an easy-to-navigate payment structure